Introduction and Functionality of DNS
– DNS is a hierarchical and distributed naming system for computers and resources on the Internet.
– It associates information with domain names, translating them into numerical IP addresses.
– DNS has been an essential component of the Internet since 1985.
– DNS serves as the ‘phone book’ of the Internet, translating human-friendly hostnames into IP addresses.
– It allows services to change locations without affecting end users.
– DNS plays a central role in distributed Internet services like cloud services and content delivery networks.
– Different users can receive different translations for the same domain name.
– DNS assigns proximal servers to users, providing faster and more reliable responses.

Administrative Responsibility and DNS
– DNS reflects the structure of administrative responsibility on the Internet.
– Each subdomain is a zone of administrative autonomy.
– Registry-operated zones have additional administrative information through RDAP and WHOIS services.
– These services provide insight and track responsibility for hosts on the Internet.

History and Evolution of DNS
– The use of memorable names instead of numerical addresses dates back to the ARPANET era.
– Stanford Research Institute maintained HOSTS.TXT, mapping host names to numerical addresses.
– DNS evolved from this simpler system to provide a more scalable and distributed solution.

DNS Records and Database
– DNS stores various types of records, including SOA, IP addresses, mail exchangers, name servers, and aliases.
– It has been expanded to store records for DNSSEC, RP, and combating spam.
– The DNS database is traditionally stored in a structured text file called the zone file.
– Other database systems are also used for DNS storage.
– DNS originally used UDP as transport but now uses TCP and other protocols.

Importance and Impact of DNS
– DNS has been an essential component of the Internet since 1985.
– It allows services to change locations without affecting end users.
– DNS plays a central role in distributed Internet services like cloud services and content delivery networks.
– Different users can receive different translations for the same domain name.
– DNS assigns proximal servers to users, providing faster and more reliable responses.
– DNS reflects the structure of administrative responsibility on the Internet.
– Each subdomain is a zone of administrative autonomy.
– DNS stores various types of records, including SOA, IP addresses, mail exchangers, name servers, and aliases.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_Name_System

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